Mystery of death of Raphael Santi
In Italy, since then, the men who died on the love bed, are escorted to the last way by the words:
"He died like Raphael"
When, how & why did raphael die
Home Raphael
Raphael ->Main page
Raphael's death mystery
Raphael's Death DEATH
Raphael killed by too much sex?
Raphael's Funeral
Untimely Death
Raphael died during sex?
Where is Raphael buried?
Raphael's death in art:

Hausen Riepe

V. Bianchini- Morgari

Johannes Riepenhausen

Pierre Nolasque Bergeret
Last Farewell of Raphael
Pietro Michis

Carl Thiel

Niccola Ulacacci
Felice Schiavoni - Raphael
Felice Schiavoni
The Last Moments of Raphael

Henry Nelson O'Neil
The Last Moments of Raphael
1866

Oil on canvas, 121.1 x 182.3 cm, Bristol Museums, Galleries & Archives

Diarii of Marcantonio Michiel:
"He died on Holy Friday (Good Friday) at night at three hours, with the coming Saturday being the day of his birth."
 

Raphael's death
According to Vasari, Raphael's premature death on Good Friday (April 6, 1520), which was possibly his 37th birthday, was caused by a night of excessive sex with Luti, after which he fell into a fever and, not telling his doctors that this was its cause, was given the wrong cure, which killed him. Vasari also says that Raphael had also been born on a Good Friday, which in 1483 fell on March 28.

Whatever the cause, in his acute illness, which lasted fifteen days, Raphael was composed enough to receive the last rites, and to put his affairs in order. He dictated his will, in which he left sufficient funds for his mistress's care, entrusted to his loyal servant Baviera, and left most of his studio contents to Giulio Romano and Penni. At his request, Raphael was buried in the Pantheon.

His funeral was extremely grand, attended by large crowds. The inscription in his marble sarcophagus, an elegiac distich written by Pietro Bembo, reads:
"Ille hic est Raffael, timuit quo sospite vinci, rerum magna parens et moriente mori", meaning:

"Here lies that famous Raphael by whom Nature feared to be conquered
while he lived, and when he was dying,
feared herself to die
"

Raphael killed by too much sex?
Raphael died during sex?
Raphael's death
Franz and Christian von Hausen Riepe (Riepenhausen)
Raphael's death
Engraving, 1816
Vasari:
"He ended the course of his life on the very day that he was born, which was Holy Friday."
Death of Raphael Sanzio by Rodolfo Morgari

Painting Inscribed V. Bianchini
After Rodolfo Morgari Italian, 1827–1909
La morte de Raffaello

(“Death of Raphael Sanzio”)
Oil on canvas, 60.75 x 51 in. (154.3 x 129.5 cm)
After a painting by Rodolfo Morgari exhibited in the Galleria del'Arte Moderna, Firenze, 1880.

According to Vasari, it was Raphael’s immoderate indulgence in “amorous pleasures”, one day taken to excess, that brought on the fever
which led to the young artist’s death in 1520. On his deathbed Raphael was forced to send La Fornarina,
his mistress, away “with the means to live an honest life.”

 
Raphael, the artist killed by too much sex?
It may be a tall tale, but the legend that the artist overindulged with his mistress has served to keep his art alive
Raphael died
during sex?
 
 

Can you die of too much sex? That's what happened to the divinely gifted Raphael, according to his 16th-century biographer Giorgio Vasari.

Vasari recounts in his book The Lives of the Artists that Raphael, who died aged 37 at the peak of his powers, was brought down by excessive passion. This view of health is medieval: the body is controlled by humours, health depends on a balance of humours, and Raphael's was destabilised by too much action in bed. Well, it's a theory.

And yet Vasari goes into detail about Raphael's emotional life. The young, gifted, handsome and courtly artist, he claims, was so enamoured of his mistress that she had to be allowed to live with him in the Villa Farnesina in Rome (as it's now called) while he was painting its frescoes. No sex, no frescoes. The story of Raphael's sensual relationship with La Fornarina, as Vasari names her, fascinated artists down the centuries. Raphael became an icon of lust.

In the Turner exhibition currently at Tate Britain, you can seen Turner's imposing painting of Rome from the Vatican Loggia, with Raphael and La Fornarina in the foreground (Raphael is showing off his latest paintings while her jewellery is scattered on the parapet). Raphael was the favourite painter of the popes. That such a perfect church painter was, in fact, making love to his mistress in the Vatican was an idea that titillated Turner – and it titillated Picasso even more.

Near the end of his life, Picasso created a series of pornographic etchings that depict Raphael and La Fornarina making love, with Michelangelo hiding under the bed.

The legend of lustful Raphael, it seems, has entranced artists. But is there any truth in it? Well, before dismissing it as a salacious tale, you have to look at Raphael's portrait of a naked woman – is she La Fornarina? – in the Barberini Palace in Rome. She stands displaying her beauty, in a pose at once classical and intimate. She wears an armband proclaiming her as his. It's a pretty unambiguous declaration of desire – not a remote ideal nude, but the artist's own lover. Surely sex didn't kill Raphael. But it does help his art live on.
Jonathan Jones - Guardian News

 

His famous painting "Transfiguration" (last major work)
was placed at the head of the bier,
and his body was buried in the Pantheon in Rome
Raphael on His Deathbed

Pierre Nolasque Bergeret
(French, 1782-1863)
Honors Rendered to Raphael on His Deathbed
“Honneurs rendus à Raphaël après sa mort”

1806

Oil on canvas. Height: 130 cm (51.2 in). Width: 190 cm (74.8 in)
Rueil-Malmaison, Musée du Château

This homage to the great Italian painter Raphael is part of a late 18th- to early 19th-century tradition of depicting the deaths of historical figures.
Here, Pope Leo X and Cardinal Bembo are seen at Raphael’s deathbed in Rome in 1520; Michelangelo, in a yellow cloak, enters the room, while
Giorgio Vasari pens the artist’s life at lower left. Though the manner is realistic, the event is not; Michelangelo was not in Rome at the time,
and Vasari was a mere eight years old. The work was exhibited at the Paris Salon in 1806, where it was purchased by Napoleon for his empress,
Josephine, who installed it in her chateau, Malmaison.

Letter from Marcantonio Michiel in Rome to Antonio di Marsilio in Venice:
"Death carried him off on the very day of his birth."
 

Raphael died during sex?
Raphael's cause of death. Myths and truth.

There is a myth that the famous artist died at the age of 37 from sexual exhaustion. Was it really so?

Version 1 (Myth)
One of the three Titans of the Renaissance was handsome as a god. However, against the backdrop of two other artists, Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo, he seemed too feminine. However, the paradox: from the famous trio only Rafael Santi was the only real man. Santi did not miss a single skirt. During his life he had at least a dozen official girlfriends, among whom was the daughter of baker Margarita Luti, nicknamed Fornarina. In Fornarina, in addition to the angelic face, genius attracted her large breasts. Since he bought a girl from his father for decent money at that time - 50 gold ducats, he considered the magnificent bust of the girl as his property. Strange as it may seem, Rafael did not want others to see his treasure. And drawing a beautiful Bunny, greatly reduced the size of her breasts.
As Italian historians assure, it was Raphael who invented then a new kind of sexual stimulation, which is now called tits rape (instead of the vagina male penis sexually attacks the female breast). And he indulged in this passion very passionately, obsessively and often. And if you believe the contemporaries, just during the next "rape" Fornarina, who never refused him, a sexually-exhausted great artist and died at the age of only 37 years. If this was true, then, presumably, Rafael died absolutely happy. In Italy, it was sacredly believed, and since then, the men who died on the love bed, there escorted the last way with the words: "He died like Raphael".

Version 2 (another myth)
Approximately as in the first version, only death came a day after the last copulation of the artist with the sexually insatiable Fornarina. And it was an ordinary coitus, not a tits rape.

Why and how did Raphael Santi die?
Version 3 (the more close to the truth) - Fornarina's infidelity. Broken Heart Master.
Rafael silently watched how Margarita cheated on him with others. And he did not say anything. He suffered so much that he could not always get out of bed in the morning. He lost weight, almost did not eat. Doctors diagnosed "a sharp exhaustion of the body." Rafael continued to paint Fornarina as a model for his paintings. He knew about her infidelity. He knew that she had become one of Rome's most dissolute courtesans. He tried to correct it. He hoped that she would change her mind, that his love would win. But the weary heart of the master could not stand it. It stopped on the day of his birth - April 6, 1520. He was only 37 years old. And he could paint many more pictures. Margarita Luti ended her life in a monastery.

Raphael's Funeral
Where is Raphael buried?
 
Raphael's deathbed
The Death of Raphael

Johannes Riepenhausen
(German, Goettingen 1788–1860 Venice)

The Death of Raphael
1832

Pen and black and brown ink; framing line in graphite and brush and gray ink
Drawings: Sheet 26.6 x 35.1 cm

 

Untimely Death. How old was Raphael, when he died?
Raphael Sanzio died from an illness and fever at the young age of 37, but what makes his untimely death even more unusual is that he died on his birthday. He died, as he was born, on April 6, 1520, and with his death came the end of the Italian Renaissance. His early death seems to have helped him avoid what he is most famous for saying: "Time is a vindictive bandit to steal the beauty of our former selves. We are left with sagging, rippled flesh and burning gums with empty sockets."
Four Interesting Facts About Raphael Sanzio by Melissa Sherrard

 

Felice Schiavoni
The Death of Raphael
1839-1859, Oil on canvas
The State Museum of Tsarskoye Selo, Pushkin

The people depicted in this painting include (19 characters):
Marcantonio Raimondi, Perino del Vaga, Vincenzo Tamagni di San Giminiano, La Fornarina, Giulio Romano, Baldassarre Peruzzi,
a friar, Gian Francesco Penni called il Fattore, Andrea Navagero, Pietro Bembo, Baldassarre Castiglione, Ludovico Ariosto,
Michelangelo, Antonio Tebaldeo, Giovanni da Udine, Benvenuto Cellini, Natale Schiavoni,
Felice Schiavoni, and Giulia Schiavoni Sernagiotto.

In 1839, the granduke Alessandro Romanov, future Alessandro II tsar of Russia, commissioned the painter Felice Schiavoni, who was born in Trieste but had been working in Venice, to execute an enormous painting depicting the participants of the funeral for Raphael. After 20 years of work, in 1859, the painting measuring about 8 square meters was sent to Saint Petersburg to be placed in the summer residence of the court in the town of Pushkin, in which the painting can still be admired.
From: Renaissance Revisited

Giovanni de Medici  in Raphael’s deathbed

Engraving by R. Bong in "The Iberian Illustration"
1885, colored
Italian Pope, named Giovanni de Medici (Leo X) in Raphael’s deathbed

Pope Leo X (1513-1521), named Giovanni de Medici
is shown here in April 1520 at Raphael's bier mourning the loss of his friend who died so young, in his early 40s.

When I view my original 19th century print of “Pope Leo X Taking His Last Farewell of Raphael,”
I see the lifeless, clothed corpse of Raphael which was meant to be temporal, and the Divinely noble spirit of beauty
which was meant to be timeless; to which even the Pope bowed, and the untattooed statues in the background testified Needless to say,
had Raphael been tainted by even a vestige of Hans Kung, his work would have remained sub-standard.

Stephen Michael Volk, Living Water

 

 

The Death of Raphael  by  Carl Thiel

Carl Thiel (1835–1900)
The Death of Raphael
Oil on canvas, 175.5 x 225 cm
Bradford Museums and Galleries

Death of Raphael  by Niccola Ulacacci

Niccola Ulacacci (1805 - 1888)
The Death of Raphael
The art collection of the University of Göttingen

  The lithograph by little-known Livorno artist Niccola Ulacacci (1805 - 1888) shows the death of the Italian painter and architect Raffael (1483 to 1520) among his friends, pupils and admirers. Raphael lies pale between the white sheets of his bed; the facial features, the long, curly hair, and the beard make him look like Christ. In the adjoining room, the painting of "Transfiguration" hangs, while Raffael died on Good Friday, 6 April 1520. In the 19th century, Raphael's life and death gained a special significance for the artists of the Romantic period. Raphael was for her both "divine artist" and "mortal God". For example, the brothers Franz and Johannes Riepenhausen, who came from Göttingen, designed two series of paintings in Rome, in which they recount the artist's life from childhood to death. The artwork of the month is the starting point for a preview of the special exhibition "Mortal Gods - Raphael and Dürer in the Art of German Romanticism", which will be shown in the art collection from the middle of April.
uni-goettingen.de
 
  The Death and Funeral of Raphael
Raphael's premature death on Good Friday (April 6, 1520), which was possibly his 37th birthday, was due to unclear causes, with several possibilities raised by historians. Vasari also says that Raphael had also been born on a Good Friday, which in 1483 fell on March 28.
Whatever the cause, in his acute illness, which lasted fifteen days, Raphael was composed enough to confess his sins, receive the last rites, and to put his affairs in order. He dictated his will, in which he left sufficient funds for his mistress's care, entrusted to his loyal servant Baviera, and left most of his studio contents to Giulio Romano and Penni.
 
   DEATH
  Raphael died on his thirty-seventh birthday April 6,1520 at the peak his career. A hard worker all his life, he had given his best to an increasing number of projects and patrons. Yet Raphael also enjoyed the pleasures of life. According to Vasari, after one all-night party, the artist returned home with a mysterious fever. He lay ill fifteen days, during which time doctors bled him, according to medical treatment of that time, "until he grew faint.” Raphael dictated his last will and testament, in which he provided for his beloved mistress Margherita, and bequeathed his studio with all its art materials to his assistants. At the time of his death, Raphael’s fortune was estimated to be 16,000 ducats.  
  Where is Raphael buried?
Raphael's tomb, sarcophagus, skeleton

At his request, Raphael was buried in the Pantheon. His funeral was extremely grand, attended by large crowds. The inscription in his marble sarcophagus, an elegiac distich written by Pietro Bembo, reads: "Ille hic est Raffael, timuit quo sospite vinci, rerum magna parens et moriente mori", meaning: "Here lies that famous Raphael by whom Nature feared to be conquered while he lived, and when he was dying, feared herself to die."
tomb
Raphael's tomb
in the Pantheon
in Rome

Raphael's sarcophagus
Raphael's
sarcophagus
in Pantheon

Raphael's Skeleton
Raphael's Skeleton
at the Opening of his Tomb
More info
The death of Raphael

The Death
of Raphael

The death of Raphael
with "The Transfiguration" hanging behind his body.
An illustration to "Italy, a poem" by Samuel Rogers, 1830.
Etching and engraving
Print made
by John Henry Robinson
after Thomas Stothard
(British, 1755 - 1834)

Dimensions: 7,9x10,8 sm (sheet).
Inscription Content:
Lettered with producer names.
National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.

Raphael
Back to
Raphael-main page
 
abc-people.com
Copyright © 2004 abc-people.com
Design and conception BeStudio © 2016-2017